2.29.2020

UNABOMBER: IN HIS OWN WORDS NEW SERIES FEATURES IN DEPTH INTERVIEWS


I just watched this new series about the Unabomber Ted Kaczynski on Netflix but it was produced for the Reelz Channel.  The Unabomber: In His Own Words and I loved it.


The Manhunt: Unabomber series on Netflix is great as well, both together are totally perfect.



Let me say one thing about this case... Linda Kaczynski solved this case!!, without Linda recognizing Ted's writing and attitude, they may never have found him in that shack in Montana. Thank you Linda are you the HERO of this story to me. Though kudos to the FBI and Newspapers that published the Manifesto.


Ted is heard narrating and commenting on certain topics. He laughs all the time and his voice seems awfully high pitched. Kind of surprising to me. He seems like a "fun" guy. It is a great show for my fellow True Crime fans.

Theodore John “Ted” Kaczynski Is the “Unabomber.” A man that gave up a promising academic career to carry out a reign of terror that killed three people and injured 23 others all because he believed that industrialization and modern–‐technology were the true evils of society.


A nationwide manhunt searching for the terrorist only known as the “Unabomber” last from 1978 –‐ 1995 until a tip led the FBI to a remote 10×12 foot cabin in the Montana mountains. The tip that took down the Unabomber came from Kaczynski’s younger brother David and David’s wife Linda.

retrokimmer@gmail.com

CARLOS LEHDER: WHAT HAPPENED TO THE COLOMBIAN RAMBO


Carlos Enrique Lehder Rivas is a German-Colombian former drug lord who was a co-founder of the Medellín Cartel. He is currently in witness protection and imprisoned in the United States though officials won't say where he is.

Carlos Lehder has been credited with revolutionizing the transportation network for delivering cocaine to the United States by vastly increasing the volume of smuggled drugs by using a fleet of airplanes based on Norman Cay in the Bahamas.. It was estimated that Lehder’s network supplied as much as 80 percent of the cocaine that arrived in the United States in the 1980s.


Though not as famous as his partners Pablo Escobar and the Rodriguez Brothers aka Gentlemen of Cali, without Carlos, they might have remained doing business on a much smaller scale in Colombia.

Carlos is one of the most colorful of all the original drug lords, so I thought he'd be fun to post about today. His power went right to his head and lack of discretion and a narcissistic love for attention led him to a life behind bars. He claimed to be a Nazi and he loved Adolph Hitler and Beatle John Lennon. Lehder had his own "Gestapo" on Norman Cay used to chase stubborn residents off the island.


Born in Armenia, Colombia, Lehder eventually ran a cocaine transport empire on Norman's Cay island, 210 miles off the Florida coast in the central Bahamas. Born: September 7, 1949 (age 70 years), Armenia, Colombia.

Lehder spent his childhood in Colombia but moved to the United States in his teens. He began smuggling stolen cars, operating in Canada and on the American east coast and was sometimes involved in the delivery of marijuana.

Pablo and Carlos

These activities led to his 1974 incarceration in a federal prison in Danbury, Connecticut. There he was housed with George Jung, who had established an operation using airplanes to bring marijuana into the United States. Johnny Depp played George Jung in the movie "Blow".


By Jung’s account, Lehder persuaded him that importing cocaine by airplane would be significantly more lucrative, and upon their release in 1976, the two went into business together, transporting the drug from Medellín, Colombia, to the United States. Within a few years, however, Lehder sidelined Jung in the business.


Chased off Norman's Cay, Carlos fled back to Colombia and He reportedly fell from favor with Pablo Escobar, the head of the Medellín cartel.

On February 4, 1987, acting on a tip that probably came from Escobar himself, Colombian national police raided a ranch near the town of Guarne in Antioquia and captured Lehder. Within hours he was extradited to the United States, which had sought his arrest since 1979. Carlos was drawing too much negative attention to the other Narcos.


Lehder went on trial in October 1987 in Jacksonville, Florida, on charges of conspiracy and running a criminal enterprise as well as other charges related to the importation and sale of cocaine. The trial continued until May 1988, when he was convicted on all counts.

Manuel Noriega and Carlos

He was later sentenced to life without parole and an additional 135 years in prison. In 1991, however, Lehder testified against Panamanian strongman Manuel Noriega, saying that Noriega had allowed Panama to be used as a conduit for the cartel’s cocaine smuggling operations. In return, Lehder’s sentence was reduced to 55 years.


Beginning in 2005, Lehder made pleas to various government entities in the United States and Colombia, saying that he was now entitled to be released under the agreement he had made in 1991, but he supposedly remains in prison, though no one seems to know where.


At one time he was being held in isolation at the maximum-security prison in Marion, Ill. But as of today, no one seems to know. Is he free? Did they cut him loose? There are rumors he is out of the prison system but with Carlos's hugely narcissistic traits, odds are he couldn't remain out of the spotlight for this long.

MISSING PERSONS WITH VOCALIST DALE BOZZIO ANNOUNCE NEW LP


The voice of ’80s new wave icons Missing Persons, Dale Bozzio, returns to the stage with an astonishing new studio album of cover songs and originals!

Produced by the multi-talented Adam Hamilton (David Hasselhoff / William Shatner), Dreaming offers lush keyboards and atmospheric interpretations of some classic rock/pop songs brought to life by Bozzio’s unmistakable voice!

Includes 2 original compositions that demonstrate Bozzio’s relevance to the modern electronic genre which her original band inspired!




Los Angeles, CA - New wave icons, and one of the most influential electronic music acts of all-time, Missing Persons featuring original vocalist Dale Bozzio, are readying a new studio album. Bozzio's inimitable vocal style, as heard on such classics as “Words,” “Destination Unknown,” and “Walking In L.A.,” is the heart and soul of Dreaming, the astonishing new studio album of cover songs and original tunes. Produced by the multi-talented Adam Hamilton (David Hasselhoff / William Shatner), Dreaming offers lush keyboards and atmospheric interpretations of some classic rock/pop songs by fellow '80s legends The Cars, Joy Division, and The The as well as The Rolling Stones, The Mama's & The Papas, and more - all brought to life by Bozzio's unmistakable voice. The album also offers 3 original compositions - the dark and moody “Lipstick,” the haunting title track “Dreaming” and the compelling “This Time” - that demonstrate Missing Persons' relevance to the modern electronic scene.

Listen to the first single, a wildly imaginative and infectious cover of Strawberry Alarm Clock's '60s classic “Incense And Peppermints”:

Bozzio offers these thoughts on the making of the album saying “This was such an easy, breezy album to make, even though it’s been a long time coming. I think fans will really appreciate the sultriness of this direction of the music and the honesty of the vocals.”

Dreaming will be available on both CD and in a limited-edition PINK vinyl as well as on all digital platforms beginning March 20.

And watch for Bozzio’s exciting, tell-all autobiography “Life Is So Strange” coming later this year!

Track List:
1. California Dreamin'
2. Lipstick
3. Dreaming
4. We Gotta Get Out Of This Place
5. Playing With Fire
6. Just What I Needed
7. This Is The Day
8. Love Will Tear Us Apart
9. Images Of Heaven
10. Incense And Peppermints
11. This Time
12. In The Rain

2.28.2020

INDIGO GIRLS LAUNCH NEW ALBUM "LOOK LONG" ON APRIL 24


“We’re still a bar band at heart,” says Emily Saliers, ahead of Indigo Girls’ 16thalbum, Look Long(April 24 / Rounder Records). “Today, we joke about being old, but what is old when it comes to music? We’re just as inspired by younger artists, and the passion feels the same as it did when we were 25 years old.”


And with that spirit, Amy Ray and Emily Saliers told themselves they “weren’t going to put boundaries on what an Indigo Girls song should be.” Check out the first single, “Shit Kickin’” on all streaming services and Youtube.

Produced by John Reynolds at Peter Gabriel’s Real World Studios in Bath, England, Look Long was born from a need to sing songs and bolster each other. “People can feel lost in these times,” Saliers explains. "Let’s lament our limitations, but let’s also look beyond what’s right in front of us, take the long view of things, and strive to do better.”

In 1999, Reynolds produced Indigo Girls’ beloved album, Come On Now Social, a time described by Ray as “one of the most important moments in our musical growth.” They’ve reunited with that same band: Reynolds on drums, bassist Clare Kenny, keyboardist Carole Isaacs, cellist Caroline Dalea, and guitarist Justin Adams, joined by their longtime violinist, Lyris Hung and vocalists Lucy Wainwright Roche and Lucy Jules (George Michael). Before flying to England, the two had agreed, “Whatever happens in the studio will happen,” says Saliers. “A lot of magic unfolded because of that decision.”



Among the many highlights are “Country Radio” (hear a great full-band version on Live From Here with Chris Thile) and Reynolds’ arrangement of a recent live staple, “Howl At the Moon.” “It’s something I always do with my daughter when we’re out in the woods,” says Amy. “I did it with my friends when we were kids.  It means you’re happy, you’re free. Explore the irreverent, but also honor the things that you should. Don’t be afraid.” In the song “Feel This Way,” Emily is singing to her younger self. She adds, “Enjoy everything, suck it all up now.”

The power of unity has always been an Indigo Girls calling card, and maybe because of it, they’ve been having a resurgence: Their audience has become more expansive and diverse, and they have a new generation of devoted peers, like Brandi Carlile and Justin Vernon, who recently said on the Broken Record podcast how he, “…adored them more and more—the more they had strength in the face of their adversity,” says Vernon. “They’re my favorite group ever.”

Since their 1989 self-titled, breakout album, the Grammy award-winning duo has racked up a slew of gold and platinum certifications and sold-out tours around the world, all while engaging in committed and uncompromising social and political activism, including immigration reform (El Refugio), LGBTQ rights, education (Dolly Parton’s Imagination Library), death penalty reform, and sustainability in Native communities. They are co-founders of Honor the Earth, a non-profit dedicated to Indigenous environmental justice and green energy solutions. They have granted over three million dollars to Native-led grassroots groups and campaigns fighting against bad energy projects but also funding sustainable ones.




Look Long tracklisting
Shit Kickin’
Look Long
Howl At the Moon
When We Were Writers
Change My Heart
KC Girl
Country Radio
Muster
Feel This Way Again
Favorite Flavor
Sorrow and Joy

Look Long Tour Dates
March 1 Rocky Mount, VA Harvester Performance Center
March 2 Nelsonville, OH Stuart’s Opera House
March 3 Dayton, OH Victoria Theatre
March 5 Knoxville, TN Tennessee Theatre
March 6 Charleston, SC Charleston Music Hall
March 7 Greensboro, SC Piedmont Hall
March 17 Red Bank, NJ Count Basie Center for the Arts
March 20 Stamford, CT The Palace Theatre
March 21 Morristown, NJ Mayo Performing Arts Center
March 22 Huntington, NY The Paramount
March 25 Collingswood, NJ Scottish Rite Auditorium
March 27 Mashantucket, CT Foxwoods Casino
March 28 Medford, MA Chevalier Theatre
May 1 Morgantown, WV Lyell B. Clay Concert Theatre
May 2 Rehoboth Beach, DE Women’s Fest
May 4 Virginia Beach, VA Sandler Center
June 19 Concord, MA Umbrella Community Arts Center
June 20 Northampton, MA The Pines
June 23 Vienna, VA Filene Center at Wolf Trap (w/ Ani DiFranco)
June 26 Highland Park, IL, Ravinia
July 2 Grand Rapids, MI, Meijer Gardens
July 4 Toronto, ON, Harbourfront Centre Concert Stage
July 6 Calgary, AB The Wildhorse Saloon
July 20 Minneapolis, MN, Music in the Zoo
July 23 Denver, CO , Botanical Gardens
July 25 Boulder, CO, Chautauqua Auditorium
July 26 Park City, UT, Deer Valley Snow Park Amphitheater
July 31 Saratoga, CA, Mountain Winery
Aug 4 Portland OR, Keller Auditorium
Aug 18-19 London, UK Islington Assembly Hall
Aug 21 Bath, UK Komedia
Aug 22 Devon, UK Beautiful Days Festival
Sept 12 Chattanooga, TN Moon River Music Festival

Ticket and show information can be found here.

www.indigogirls.com                                retrokimmer@gmail.com           

JUSTICE: SETTING A COURSE FOR THE FUTURE


The decisions that you make now have long-term effects in all things, both for yourself and others. There will always come a time where you will be judged. The Justice tarot card appearing in a reading signals that a judgment will be made fairly and accordingly. The decisions that you have made in the past will be carefully weighed with fairness. Your feelings around this card may differ depending on your situation.


If you have been wronged, this card's appearance may bring you relief. On the other hand, if your actions caused pain to others, this card serves as a warning. Her appearance represents a chance for you to change your actions now for a better future.  retrokimmer@gmail.com

ROBERT CRAY'S THAT'S WHAT I HEARD OUT TODAY!

credit: Jeff Katz

“Funky, cool and bad,” is how Robert Cray describes his latest album, That’s What I Heard, out today. “I thought if it we could get this thing that Sam Cooke used to have, the kind of sound that early Sam Cooke records had, that we could pull this off,” says producer Steve Jordan.

Over the past four decades, Cray has created a sound that rises from American roots, blues, soul and R&B, with five Grammy wins, 20 acclaimed studio albums and a bundle of live albums that punctuate the Blues Hall of Famer’s career. On That’s What I Heard, Robert celebrates the music of Curtis Mayfield, Bobby “Blue” Bland, The Sensational Nightingales and more, alongside four newly written songs.

Check out That’s What I Heard, and read Robert’s tribute to his late friend Tony Joe White on Rolling Stone.

Cray and Jordan go way back, having met during the making of the Chuck Berry documentary Hail! Hail! Rock ’n’ Roll, in 1987. They started working together in 1999, when Jordan produced the Grammy-winning Take Your Shoes Off, and the recent Grammy-nominated LP, Robert Cray & Hi Rhythm. That’s What I Heardis their sixth album. “Once you start working with Steve, it’s kind of hard to get away from him,” said Robert.

The music on That’s What I Heardfalls into two camps, the sweet and the funky. Of the former, “You’re the One” comes from the Bobby “Blue” Bland songbook. “There’s this thing where I feel you kind of gotta get out of your own head when you're covering one of your heroes,” Cray explained. “Bobby’s one of those. You just let yourself go, and do the song because you love it.”

credit: Antoine Sanfuentes

Don Gardner’s “My Baby Likes to Boogaloo” and the Billy Sha-Rae minor hit, “Do It” are acknowledged rarities (the originals can be heard on the compilation, Groove & Grind: Rare Soul). “Do It” is leaner and meaner, the sort of bare-bones funk that defined the Detroit club sound in the early ’70s with Sha-Rae, Dennis Coffey, and Earl Van Dyke. Cray’s steamroller rendition gets a little extra push from guest guitarist Ray Parker, Jr., who played in Sha-Rae’s band as a teen.

“Burying Ground” is a sacred song from the Sensational Nightingales, inspired by Cray’s youth, when Sundays on the stereo were reserved for his parents’ gospel records. Curtis Mayfield wrote “You’ll Want Me Back” for Major Lance, and Cray wrote “To Be with You” for his late friend, Tony Joe White. “Hot” is another Cray original. “As for the lyrics, “We always say to ourselves, ‘I’m old, but I’m hot,’” he said, and laughed. Spotted hanging around the studio, Steve Perry sang harmony vocals on “Promises You Can’t Keep,” written by Steve Jordan, Kim Wilson and Danny Kortchmar.



“Robert is just a great person besides being extraordinary talent,” adds Jordan. “People gravitate to his guitar playing first, but I think he’s one of the best singers I’ve heard in my life. Not only because of his singing ability, but his interpretations. He’s such an honest soul in my opinion.”

Robert’s band features Richard Cousins (bass), Dover Weinberg (keyboards), Terence F. Clark (drums), and Steve Jordan (drums, percussion).



That’s What I Heard Tracklist
“Anything You Want” (Robert Cray)
“Burying Ground” (traditional)
“You’re the One” (Deadric Malone)
“This Man” (Robert Cray)
“You’ll Want Me Back” (Curtis Mayfield)
“Hot” (Robert Cray)
“Promises You Can’t Keep” (Steve Jordan/Danny Kortchmar/Kim Wilson)
“To Be with You” (Robert Cray”
“My Baby Likes To Boogaloo” (Don Gardner)
“You Can’t Make Me Change” (Robert Cray)
“Little Less Lonely” (Richard Cousins/Hendrix Ackle)
“Do It” (Jack Ashford/Lorraine Chandler)

Tour Dates
Feb 28 Charles Town, WV Hollywood Casino
Feb 29 Glenside, PA Keswick Theatre
March 1 Patchogue, NY Patchogue Theatre
March 3 Brownfield, ME Stone Mountain Arts Center
March 5 Plymouth, MA Plymouth Memorial Hall
March 6 Burlington, VT Flynn Center
March 7 Ridgefield, CT Ridgefield Playhouse
March 8 Verona, NY Turning Stone Resort Casino
March 10 Troy, NY Troy Savings Bank Music Hall
March 11 Englewood, NJ Bergen Performing Arts Center
March 13 Greenburg, PA Palace Theatre
March 14 Kent, OH The Kent Stage
March 15 Kalamazoo, MI Kalamazoo Theatre
March 17 Madison, WI Barrymore Theatre
March 18 Milwaukee, WI The Northern Lights Theatre
March 19 Des Moines, IA Hoyt Sherman Place
March 20 Skokie, IL North Shore Center for the Performing Arts
April 9 San Juan Capistrano, CA The Coach House
April 10 Scottsdale, AZ Talking Stick Casino
April 11 Henderson, NV Henderson Bluesfest
April 15 Livermore, CA Bankhead Theatre
April 16 Sacramento, CA Crest Theatre
April 17 Merced, CA The Art Kamangar Center
April 18 Solvang, CA Solvang Festival
May 1 Birmingham, UK Town Hall
May 3 Cambridge, UK Cambridge Corn Exchange
May 4 Oxford, UK New Theatre Oxford
May 5 Portsmouth, UK Portsmouth Guildhall
May 7 St. Albans, UK Alban Arena
May 8 London, UK Cadogan Hall
May 9 Basingstroke, UK
May 11 Buxton, UK Buxton Opera House
May 14 Manchester, UK The Bridgewater Hall
May 15 Newcastle upon Tyne, UK 02 City Hall
May 16 Edinburgh, UK The Queen’s Hall
June 18 Austin, TX One World Theatre

www.robertcray.com                                        retrokimmer@gmail.com

CHARLES WHITMAN'S CLOCK TOWER SHOOTING SPREE 1966


Before Virginia Tech, Columbine, Sandy Hook, Aurora and Orlando there was the horrific University of Texas tower shooting. 54 years ago on August 1, 1966, Charles Joseph Whitman, a twenty-five year old University of Texas student and ex-marine, climbed to the top of the iconic University of Texas Clock Tower and went on a shooting spree, killing 14 people and wounding at least 33 others.

Charles Whitman with his mother and wife

In the early morning hours prior to the UT attack, Whitman murdered his beloved mother and then his wife in cold blood. Another individual died years later of complications from a gunshot wound inflicted during the UT attack, bringing the total death toll to 17. At the time, this seemingly senseless massacre of civilians was unprecedented and considered the worst mass murder in modern U.S. history.


What set the Texas Tower shooting apart was the instantaneousness of its coverage on radio and television by reporters on the scene who described the events as they happened.


Above: A victim of sniper Charles Whitman is placed into a waiting ambulance during the shooting spree at the University of Texas in Austin, Aug. 2, 1966. Until the carnage at Virginia Tech Monday, April 16, 2007, the Aug. 1, 1966, the sniper rampage by Charles Whitman from the Austin school's landmark 307-foot tower had remained the deadliest campus shooting in U.S. history. (AP Photo)

Whitman and wife Kathy

I don’t want her (his wife) to have to face the embrasssment [sic] my actions would surely cause her.…I truly do not consider this world worth living in, and am prepared to die, and I do not want to leave her to suffer alone in it….Similar reasons provoked me to take my mother’s life. Note from Whitman



Sometime after midnight August 1, Whitman went to his mother’s apartment, where he took her life. Returning home, he killed his wife at about 3:00 AM on August 1, stabbing her as she slept. Again he paused to document his actions, though he wrote nothing about the events to come.


Whitman placed all of these weapons around the top of the clock tower so he could run and shoot from all directions.


Above: These brave officers made their way to the top of the Tower and shot and killed the sniper.



As police began arriving in greater numbers, they were joined by private citizens (many alerted by the on-the-scene radio report of the incident as it occurred) who came armed with hunting rifles. The expanding fire from the ground forced Whitman to seek shelter behind the observation deck’s thick walls and limited his targeting ability by confining him to shooting through waterspouts.

The officers removing the body of Charles Whitman

As a result of the lack of communication technology, the assault that ended Whitman’s rampage came about rather haphazardly. Using stairs and the elevator, three police officers and an armed citizen (the university bookstore manager!!), acting largely independently, found themselves together on the 27th floor.

UT Clock Tower Memorial

Without a plan or any real coordination, all four men took to the observation deck in a successful attempt to surround Whitman, enabling policemen Ramiro Martinez and Houston McCoy to shoot and kill Whitman.



After more than 90 terrifying minutes, Whitman’s murder spree had been brought to an end. Excluding his wife and mother, he had killed 14 people (including the unborn child) and wounded another 31 (one of whom would die some 30 years later after deciding to end the daily dialysis treatments necessitated by his wounds). read more


Why did Charles Whitman commit this heinous crime? Was it that his Daddy was a bully? Or his lackluster attempts to achieve success in college? Or was it a brain tumor that caused him to lose his mind?


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

addtoany